Police Training Shoot House, Home Grown and Impressive

Police Training Shoot House, Home Grown and Impressive

A police training success story. Sheriff’s ingenuity with the help of the local community build a training shoot house from 100% donations.
Jackson County sheriff’s Deputy Phil Cicero says he’s pleased with the agency’s new “shoot house” that will be used for SWAT training and training for other high-risk calls inside homes.

This story originally appeared in Medford Mail Tribune.

The training house was assembled from materials donated by several area businesses. It sits at the Jackson County Sports Park on Kershaw Road, but the structure is restricted from public use.

The 40-foot-by-48-foot building certainly isn’t a handsome piece of real estate. Its sides already are chipped from bullet holes and the bare plywood exterior doesn’t project all the comforts of home.

But the shoot house gives SWAT deputies a place to practice room-clearing, forced entries and other important tactical skills.

The shoot house contains several rooms that can be altered to give the space a different look for each training exercise.

Combined Fire and Police Training Center May Cut Costs By $300,000

The combined Fire and Police Training Center in Round Rock Texas (near Austin) may cut current training cost by around $300,000. Earlier this year Interact Business Group completed a strategic business plan for the project that took into account existing training conditions, including travel to out of area training locations, staff overtime and equipment efficiencies. The combined training center project cost estimate is $38.3 million and is being planned for voter approval on November’s ballot as a bond issue.

“This is looking at the future of not only the police officers safety, but the citizens safety,” said Round Rock Police Training Sgt. Sean Johnson. “As we grow (population of more than 100,000), we need a training area to allow our officers to be the best that they can get.”


See the Sgt Sean Johnson interview and XKAN news report

Most, if not all, training would be done right on site, eliminating travel costs and time. It would also cut the cost of officers and firefighters being away from their regular posts.

It’s not just a dollar issue for the city’s emergency responders. “There are (high risk calls) that don’t happen in the real world every day,” Johnson said. “So, if we don’t practice those skills, it’s a perishable skill, then we’ll lose that skill set.”

The strategic plan identified several key factors in the analysis:

  1. What are the current and future training needs? 
  2. What are the training need priorities?
  3. What will it cost to build the facility?   
  4. What are the preliminary site plans and equipment requirements? 
  5. What will it cost to annually operate the facility?
  6. What are the potential revenue opportunities from outside users?
  7. Are there possible partnering arrangements with other area departments?
  8. What is the cost benefit of a facility over existing conditions training?

A key training hurdle facing the departments was finding local public spaces for repetitive training. For example, fire trucks are forbidden from doing repeated driver exercises on open parking lot areas. That’s because the 80,000 pound vehicles tear up the pavement there.

“Having an area that’s designed specifically for that is going to be valuable,” said assistant chief Billy Wusterhausen.

Sandy Hook is an example of a mass casualty incident where first responders would be more effective if they had repeated training with other departments.

 “As we grow out to that 250,000 population and we’re still the second safest city in the United States, we will have done it right,” Sgt. Johnson said.

Fire Chief David Coatney said depending on what Round Rock voters agree to, the build-out could happen in stages to spread out the cost over several years.

Some training elements being considered for the combined fire and police training center include:

  • Firearms Complex
  • Urban Training Area
  • High Speed Driving Center
  • Driver Avoidance Pad
  • Live Fire Burn Training Rooms
  • Multi-Story Tower
  • Outside Training City Grid
  • Technical Rescue Props
  • Swift Water Rescue Prop
  • Wildland Fire Training Area

Local Round Rock firm KAH Architecture and Interior Design assisted Interact Business Group in the development of the training center site layout.

To read more about similar police and fire department training center projects and more details about Strategic Business Planning Process follow the links below

  • Public Safety Training Newsletter – a monthly e-newsletter covering the top news, events and announcements in Public Safety Training. Click here and sign-up (lower right) to read the current issue and get updates.
  • Responder Gateway – A full featured First Responder news and resource hub. One Place, One Stop, One Source, Visit here and receive daily or weekly fire service or law enforcement news events, alerts or important announcements.
  • Bill Booth Blog – Timely opinions and articles, on issues and comments about public safety training center management, funding and operations. Click here to read and get updates.

Click HERE to read more

Training, Above All Else, SAFE

Training for police, fire and all emergency responders is essential. Training must be challenging, realistic but above all else, safe. Allow me to repeat, safe. Every training related death is a tragedy and in nearly all cases, avoidable. (I would say in all cases they were avoidable but I do not have the research data to support every training related death.)

Last week a University of Maryland police recruit was critically wounded. Prompted by this tragedy, I set out to look beyond the finger pointing and law suits that are sure to come and try to understand how an accident of this type could take place and then to take another look deeper at the nationally recognized training safety standards.  The following report by the Baltimore Sun provides excellent background on the incident and is supported by several nationally recognized training experts. Several points in the article seem so very obvious, yet need to be repeated over and over again, forever:

    • No gun – even a practice weapon – should be fooled with.
    • Never point a weapon at an item or person unless you intend to shoot it.

Missteps in Trainee Shooting Ran Afoul of Standards, Experts Say Baltimore Police Department promises a full review

By Justin George  | The Baltimore Sun 

The director of Baltimore’s police training academy didn’t know that instructors were holding exercises at an abandoned psychiatric hospital in Owings Mills. There were no supervisors on site. A police service weapon somehow got mixed up with a practice paint-cartridge pistol. The gun was pointed at a trainee . . . click to continue

Here are several more detail reports concerning the trainee shooting

  1. Was It a Joke Gone Wrong?
  2. Concerns That Training Was Not Fully Staffed When Recruit Was Shot
  3. Police refuse to release policies in wake of training shooting