Quantifying Stress in Police Training

by John Wills

We know the importance of training in police work as it relates to our survival. Anyone who is not familiar with the axiom, The way you train, is the way you fight, has probably been hiding underneath a rock somewhere in the mountains. Stress influences the way we react to situations on the street. What we as trainers need to understand, and subsequently structure our courses to combat, is to somehow replicate that stress, and train our officers to win, in spite of the deleterious effects that stress has on our performance.

In 1998, Bruce Siddle conducted research involving officers in an identical training scenario with various stressors included. There are not many studies of this kind, since controlling all of the variables and quantifying results is an enormous task. Nevertheless, Siddle embarked on this ground breaking journey, and titled the work, Combat Human Factors: Triggering the Survival Circuit.

In the study, he discussed a great many things, to include how we shoot. He compared and contrasted Isosceles and One Hand Point shooting, as they relate to close quarter combat.

Continue reading…..

 

JOHN M. WILLS  / http://www.johnmwills.com/
 John is a former Chicago police officer and retired FBI agent. He writes both non-fiction and fiction in the form of novels, short stories, articles and poetry. John is an award-winning author who created The Chicago Warriors Thriller Series. He has published more than 125 articles in print and online (see his monthly article on officer.com) and is working on his sixth book.

 

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