How Emergency Management Is Changing

Like all professions, emergency management has evolved throughout the years to become what it is today – a defined field of work that’s paving a career path for future employees. The modern concept of emergency management has grown from the civil defense days – when in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created a federal office to protect civilians and respond to community needs in wartime. As state and local governments saw the need for programs focusing on emergency management, veterans and retired first responders were the go-to candidates to fill these positions.

Emergency management has had its share of challenges as people – from government and the public – sought to understand what it is and why it’s important. Even though historically there has always been some aspect of emergency management in the United States, hurricanes and earthquakes in the late 1960s and early ’70s were catalysts behind legislation and an increased focus on natural disasters. Then in 1979, FEMA was created by presidential order, and people saw the likenesses between the agency and civil defense. There also was a shift toward focusing on all hazards.

Since the profession was traditionally filled with first responders and veterans, it was a male-dominated field, but that’s changing, and programs are developing to educate the work force’s next generation¬† …read more

This article reprinted by permission of EmergencyManagement.com

By: Elaine Pittman

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